The Beauty of Life

The real world is not like a video game where if you die, you have three more lives left to spare. You have one life and one life only. Being alive is so precious; your mother and father brought you into this world for a reason. Why waste it?  “Life doesn’t come with a rewind, fast-forward, or pause button. Once it starts, it plays until it ends or until you press the stop button. Never press the stop button, just enjoy it while it plays” (Parker). Everyone goes through difficult obstacles, pain, and struggles; they are all part of life. How do you know when enough is enough? Of course, people have limitations based on how much they are able to handle before calling it quits. But how do we gauge that before it’s too late? It is important to seek out for help whether if it’s with a professional or from friends and family. 

As parents, we assume and immediately point fingers, “what did you do to my kid?” or “what did you do to make my kid to act that way?” We need to take responsibility and reach out to our kids and loved ones. It starts by showing interest and interacting with one another. Perhaps the whole family needs to eat at the dinner table for once and not be occupied with the TV or their phones, but instead socializing and asking how was everyone’s day. Social interaction needs to be present in order to build stronger relationships; communication is key. This will later lead to trust and opening up to any  problems/issues. I can relate to this because from personal experience, I never used to eat my meals at the dining table with my family; instead I would just eat in the living room and watch TV. Now I eat with my whole family at the dining table and I’m closer to my sisters and my mom.

“Each year, more than 41,000 individuals die by suicide, leaving behind their friends and family members to navigate the tragedy of loss. In many cases, friends and families affected by a suicide loss (often called “suicide loss survivors”) are left in the dark. Too often the feelings of shame and stigma prevent them from talking openly” Losing 41,000 individuals is one thing, let’s multiply that by a 100, which equals 4,100,000. Now about 4 million friends and families are suicide survivors struggling with their loss. Let’s take a moment to let that sink in. Some people say committing suicide is selfish because the individual is only thinking about themselves and not others. In other words, the pain the person went through then spreads and affects all the people he or she knew, like a domino effect. Here are some primary triggers on why people tend to take their life… Stress, depression, anxiety, family loss, physical abuse, sexual abuse, PTSD, high standards/expectations, rape, LGBTQ, financial debt, relationships, drug addiction, and so on Suicide Prevention .

There’s always someone who cares about you, needs you, and loves you. Don’t ever think you are alone because there are people that truly care. Whenever you find yourself doubting how far you can go, just remember how far you have come. Remember everything you have faced, all the battles you have won, and all the fears you have overcome. YOU are not alone! YOU are worth it!

People who are categorized in the lower and middle class automatically assume that people with money have the good life. There’s a widely used line: “money isn’t everything.” In other words, it means the wealthy don’t have to worry about anything since money is not a problem, and they don’t have to work as hard as the lower and middle class. However, that’s not the case. In one month, we unfortunately lost two well-known people due to suicide – Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade celebrities. We can clearly see suicide does not discriminate, and it can happen to everyone. Your age, race, gender, or where you come from does not matter. Just like with any disease, suicide can happen to anyone.

What can we do to help or prevent it? Suicide awareness month lands on September every year. Get involved with your local mental health or suicide foundations and contribute to your community. It’s starts by being aware, educating yourself, and educating others around you. Did you know by just saying “Hi” and smiling, you can be a hero and could save a person’s life? According to Roy Baumeister and Mark Leary, they did a study and explained “both psychological and physical health problems are more common among people who lack social attachments” Study . This means people who are mentally suffering are less inclined to come out and talk about their problems; therefore, they need to be approached first. Usually we see a lot of these friendly, open personalities among the elderly, whether you’re waiting at the bus stop or at waiting in a grocery line. The elderly love to chit chat and always seem to be in a happy mood, which eventually rubs on to others.

I had a beautiful close friend that I met in junior bowling about ten years ago, and she is flying with angels right now. Her name was Amanda, but she preferred to be called “Hobo.” She was the most energetic happiest person I’ve ever met in the alley.  She always had a positive attitude and there was never a dull moment with her. It was very heartbreaking and emotional to find out she left us two years ago by taking her life.  Her mother, Jodi Beaty, the Founder and President of the local Blue Gardenia Foundation, offers education, awareness, and help to prevent suicide and assist those who are affected by anxiety and depression. Mrs. Beaty’s mission with the Blue Gardenia Foundation is “to bring awareness, in a positive way, advocacy, education, research and community support” Blue Gardenia Foundation. Having suffered a personal tragedy, Beaty uses her story, so other parents won’t have to go through what she went through. Since the Blue Gardenia Foundation is a local non-profit foundation; unfortunately, it’s not funded or sponsored. All generous donations are welcome!!!

 

For more information contact:

Jodi Beaty –  bluegardeniafoundation@gmail.com

 

 

Advertisements
Tags:

2 Comments to “The Beauty of Life”

  1. Hi there! This was a very powerful article and it was extremely moving in terms of the personal stories you told throughout it. However, I had some questions about some of your statistics. In the third paragraph, you mention that 41,000 people commit suicide each year and then you later go on to multiply that number by 100. I was curious as to the significance of the 100 in this case- is it the number of suicide loss survivors or something different? I would also like to further press other solutions to the suicide stigma in our society. What more can we do outside of saying hello and being friendly to our neighbors? Perhaps the taboo around mental health should first be acknowledged and addressed, and then our communities could help implement strong support systems for those who suffer. This could range from better healthcare to even just support people better in our lives. Really informative and impactful article, I enjoyed reading it!

  2. Wow. What a very touching story about your friend. I’m very sorry to hear that happened to such a beautiful soul. I find that in life, myself and other people around me are constantly asking themselves the ever looming question of, “when is enough, enough?” Sometimes days I’m on the side of, “well, life will never throw anything our way that we can’t handle.” But other days I really begin to understand Brittney’s 2007 meltdown (in complete seriousness). I think that it’s just apart of being human though. Anyone who’s ever been on the edge of a cliff grasping for help by their fingertips can tell you that someone, somewhere, was worth continuing the fight that is life. Some of us aren’t as fortunate, but if we take a moment to realize that 7 billion of us today are that fortunate, those aren’t such bad odds I think. The stigma around mental health is definitely one that can improve, but humans are inherently emotional beings, and everyone has their own destiny. Everything happens for a reason ❤

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: