Archive for ‘Environment’

June 29, 2019

The Individual’s Responsibility in the Name of Fast Fashion

“Beauty is pain” is a mantra that has been immortalized in the fashion industry. Although the phrase is more directed towards women, it is a universal suggestion that consumers must sacrifice something in the name of fashion. However, in light of recent movements for consumers to be conscientious of which types of companies they patronize, beauty – in the context of fast fashion – can now be viewed as a tangible pain to both the environment and forced laborers.

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June 28, 2019

Justice Remains Unserved for Standing Rock Sioux

Oil pipelines are one of the many examples of resources that are harming our environment, with that being said, the reason the Dakota Access Pipeline is such a substantial issue is because it not only damages our ecosystem, but it also passes through sacred lands of the Standing Rock Sioux. These pipelines are a long standing controversy and a symbol of the bigger battle over the future of energy production and climate change policy over the past several years. The Standing Rock Sioux reservation is heavily impacted by this occurrence since they are the soul nuisance standing in the way of the creation of this oil pipeline.

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June 26, 2019

Climate Change, HB 2020, and You

Climate change: it affects us all. It doesn’t matter how old you are, how wealthy you are, what you do for a living, what ethnicity you are, or what country you are from. So long as you reside on plant Earth, you are susceptible to the harmful effects of climate change. Some, however, are more susceptible than others. Likewise, some are more responsible for the development of this issue than others. And so, it is the moral duty of those responsible to use that same power to find solutions. As one of the main contributors to the excessive carbon dioxide emissions that’s caused climate change, the United States has been coming up with ways to play their part in bettering the issue. In the state of Oregon, government officials are attempting to pass House Bill 2020, also referred to as the “cap-and-trade bill,” which aims to place a cap on Oregon’s carbon emissions. The bill has sparked controversy among Oregon residents and even resulted in the walkout of Republican state senators. However, with the rapid development of climate change, we cannot afford to postpone or take more time to decide on plans to resolve it.

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June 24, 2019

Travel the World Safely by Being Croc-wise

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Do you like to travel? Are you fully equipped with the knowledge to keep both you and your family safe while you adventure through new areas? How does the tiny nation of Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor sound? Former Portuguese colony, Timor-Leste is located northwest of Australia in the Timor sea. It is a rather special vacation destination as it is ringed by coral reefs and teeming with marine life.

There are 23 living crocodilian species recognized and they’re found in over 90 countries in the world and surrounding islands. Almost all people will travel to at least one of these 90 countries in their lifetime, so being informed about crocodiles should be important to everyone.

Almost 37% of the Timor-Leste population lives below the international poverty line of $1.25 USD per day, 50% of the population is illiterate and the population is currently facing lots of problems with development, economic and political issues. Among these, environmental issues regarding crocodiles is becoming more and more alarming as people keep disappearing.

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June 30, 2018

Plastic Pollution is a Major Problem

I researched plastic pollution to write a paper about how it affects the environment, when I was a freshman in highschool. Then again as a senior in highschool. 5 years later and I’m writing about it again. I realize all the information is the same, yet the situation seems to be getting worse. Plastic pollution continues to grow throughout the entire world, even to places where no humans being have ever been. Plastic does so much damage to our environment, there needs to be more of an effort to fix this crisis. 

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June 30, 2018

The Last Stand of The Not so Big, Not so Bad Wolf

afterglow-animal-backlit-247583By Kāʻai Fernandez

So, you’re an endangered Red Wolf. First off, congratulations on that; secondly, you’ve got some problems. Okay, “some” is an understatement, but I’m sure you’re not worried… right? You’re an endangered species—that’s a bummer. And, even though you used to live throughout this place called America, from Texas to Pennsylvania, you now only live in North Carolina; oh, and there are fewer than a 100 of you left in the wild. You’ve been hunted, shot, starved and butchered—life’s been difficult.

And life is about to get a whole lot worse.

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June 29, 2018

The Next Gold Rush Won’t Be For Gold

The year was 1848. It was the Monday of January 24th. Anyone familiar with that date? Anyone? Well, it is not an entirely well-known date in American history, or history at all for that matter, unless you are one of the lucky people with an incredible memory for dates. Everyone knows those people. It’s the people who never forget your birthday even though you haven’t talked with them since freshman year of high school, fourteen years ago. It’s the people who know exactly when Memorial Day is versus Labor Day, because let’s be honest, most of us tend to mix the two up. Back to the point however, unless you have an incredibly sharp memory with history, you probably do not recall January 24th, 1848, so allow me to clue you in. January 24th, 1848 was the day Foreman James W. Marshall was working for Pioneer John Sutter up in Coloma, a town about an hour away from California’s capital, Sacramento. While working at Sutter’s Mill, Marshall found a shiny metal in the tailrace of the mill that he was building for Sutter on the American River. Is the memory coming back to you now? No? Well, fear not, I will continue. That shiny metal piece that good ole’ James W. Marshall had found ended up being the beginning of a hunt, of a quest, of a pursuit. For that shiny piece of metal was a man’s ticket to a life full of riches. That shiny piece of metal was gold, and it began what was called the California Gold Rush. 

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June 29, 2018

How Environmental Stewardship Saves Our Coral Reefs

diving-1808717_1920By Eve Berlinsky

Our current geological age has notably been titled the Anthropocene period. Anthropocene means “human caused,” and refers to humanity’s often detrimental influence on the planet that we all call home. This ranges from our impacts on the ocean to the rainforests to the atmosphere to anything else on this planet. There is little to no place on this earth that has not been affected by people in some way. For now, I will focus on the biggest and oldest thing humans have put at risk- the coral reefs.

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June 26, 2018

Your Daily Coffee Is About To Get Roasted

Many are familiar with the name Al Gore. The 45th Vice President of the United States of America. Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election. Divorcee of his high school sweetheart. 1969 Army enlistee. Well now I’m getting off track. The point is, most have heard the name Al Gore at some point in their lives, whether they lived through his vice-presidential terms, or they have heard his name on the news when topics of climate change are brought up. Regardless, Al Gore was ahead of his time. He argued on the existence of climate change and the obligation we have to bring it under control, even winning the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. However, even now, eighteen years after he served as the Vice President and fought for the country to gain a control on climate change, many still do not believe that climate change is a problem that affects them.

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June 24, 2018

Amusement and Theme Parks Would Be Wise to Follow in SeaWorld’s Footsteps

Every month I look forward to receiving my monthly copy of National Geographic. The vibrant, striking photos on the cover with their intriguing captions and headlines never cease to capture my attention. This month, when I pulled my copy out of the mailbox, I was immediately struck by the beauty of the iceberg the cover image displayed. It was bright, white, and shimmering in the sunlight, reflecting itself onto the ocean surrounding it. However, upon closer glance, I came to the realization that it was no iceberg at all, but instead, it was a plastic bag partly submerged in the ocean with the headline “Planet or Plastic? 18 billion pounds of plastic ends up in the ocean each year. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.”   

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August 9, 2017

The Wall That Could Kill All

industry-1752876_640From the beginning of Trump’s presidential campaign in 2016, he has always mentioned that he wants to build a wall along the US-Mexico Border. As his political career progressed and as he was elected president, a wall started becoming the wall. The wall has caused a lot of controversies within our government and society as individuals from many sides are at conflict with one another about the construction of the wall. One of the main issues is on the environmental impact the wall will have on our planet. On August 1, the Department of Homeland Security released a memo stating that the Department of Homeland Security has issued a waiver to waive certain laws and regulations to expedite the construction of the border wall along San Diego, marking this as the first major construction for the wall. Studies have shown that the wall will reap many consequences to the environment that surrounds the wall such as escalating the endangerment of more species and adding to the pollution of the terrain if the government is to proceed with this decision. The wall needs to be stopped and should not be furthered develop as the wall will only increase the rates of endangered species dying and intensify the high carbon emission level the US is producing.

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August 15, 2015

Target Island Needs $1 Billion from US Military

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By: Megan Kono

The Island of Kaho’olawe is just off the coast of Maui and was used by the US Navy for military target practice. The Navy bombed the 45 square mile island from World War II. After decades of protests by the Native Hawaiians, President George H W. Bush ordered the military to stop their target practice in December of 1990. It was agreed that the military would remove 100% of the ordinance from Kahoolawe.

Forty-two years later, “Despite an expensive cleanup of unexploded ordnance [by the US Military], the island and its surrounding waters are still littered with bullets, shells and bombs.” Scientists from over fifty countries urge the “U.S. military to spend $1 billion to remove the unexploded ordnance on Kahoolawe and restore its environment.” The Navy’s failure to clean up Kaho’olawe has caused damage to the Island and Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners; they should be held responsible for the damage they have caused.

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August 15, 2015

The Naked Truth behind the Backpackers in their Birthday Suits

naked-trip_3314697kby Esther Ng

It took several hours. I had believed them when they told me that oxygen thinned as you went higher in altitude, but I wasn’t prepared for the onslaught of first-hand experience. It took nearly twenty breaks in between scaling the smooth slab of rocks to eventually reach the base of the highest peak of Mount Kinabalu—Low’s Peak, or so it was named. On my left was South Peak, the second highest peak whose image is emblazoned on Malaysia’s hundred ringgit note. My breathing was difficult and shallow, and I thought, for probably the hundredth time that day, that any hopes of scaling Mount Everest were an immediate shutdown.

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August 15, 2015

Hawaii Need’s to Burn its Recycling Program

Going green? Our society has seen some drastic changes when it comes to protecting the environment.  For some, when they hear the words “Global Warming,” Al Gore comes to mind. The Inconvenient Truth presentation given by Al Gore illustrates the harsh realities of our environmental impact on Earth. To this day, right before I throw my plastic bottle into the waste can or “grey barrel”, I can’t help but to stop and think of the melting iceberg with the adorable polar bear on it.

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August 15, 2015

TechNOlogy

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By: Maria Goodwin

Compare a personal public bus ride experience with an bus experience your grandparents have had. It’s likely they will tell of fresh conversation and meeting new people. These days, we put plugs in and tune out. Screens surround us – iPods, TVs, cellphones, computers – our lives are enveloped in technology and if often seems there is no escaping it. Millennials  are very attached to technology, but the most in ‘danger’ of a full real-world detachment are the future generations who will grow up completely surrounded by technology. I have watched my little cousins all sit together and not say one word to each while they stare blankly into their bring screens. A moment meant to be spent in community is squandered while emojis are jammed into a text box. As a nanny of six years, what I found most terrifying was the youngest boy being able to work his way around Youtube and iPhone apps, but he could barely form full sentences. Though we’ve made countless important discoveries and have accomplished a great deal thanks to the ever-evolving technological world, the lasting effect it has on our upcoming generations is one I feel could be devastating, especially in a social context.

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August 13, 2015

Mauna Kea’s Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) benefits Hawaii

FILE - This undated file artist rendering made available by the TMT Observatory Corporation shows the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope, planned to be built atop Mauna Kea, a large dormand volcano in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii in Hawaii. Gov.  About 20 people opposed to building what would be one of the world's largest telescopes on a Hawaii mountain are camped out near the construction site, Tuesday, June 23, 2015, vowing to stop work from resuming.  (AP Photo/TMT Observatory Corporation, File) NO SALES

The summit of Mauna Kea is the Earth’s clearest window to the rest of the Universe. Mauna Kea when measured from sea level is the highest point in the Pacific Ocean. From the base at the bottom of the sea, Mauna Kea is the tallest mountain on Planet Earth.

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August 13, 2015

End Nuclear Research and Development

Nuclear weapons pose the highest threat to the existence of mankind than any other because of their radioactive nature. It is a fact that a single nuclear warhead can kill millions of people and its effects lasting for many years. Nuclear power plants also run the risk of directly impacting our environment.

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August 12, 2015

May Cecil the Lion’s Wrongful Death Not Be in Vain

Cecil with Cubs 1By Susan Ha

When you think of Africa, what animal stands out to you as the king of the jungle? The lion, of course, and that is why it is named so. The lion is at the top of the food chain, and has forever been a symbol of “strength, power, and ferocity.” Its roar can be heard from 5 miles away, and it can run as fast as 50 mph for short distances, and leap as far as 36 feet. Lions are also the most social of all big cats, and live together in prides, which consists mostly of females and a few males. Cecil was such a beautiful and majestic 13 year old lion and the king of his pride, which consisted of 3 lionesses and 8 cubs, and he had a rare black mane to show it. He was very friendly and tame, and thousands of tourists came yearly to Hwange National Park, a wildlife reserve in Zimbabwe, just to see him.

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August 12, 2015

The Tent City: Running Out Of Room For Sweeps

Tents line the sidewalks at Ohe Street near Waterfront Park in Kakaako. 30dec2014 . photograph Cory Lum/Civil Beat http://www.civilbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/kakaako-homeless-ohe-street1-640x322.jpg

Tents in Kakaako. 30dec2014 . photograph Cory Lum/Civil Beat.

As I drive by Kaka’ako, I see homeless children, mothers, and fathers, pushing their possessions in a shopping cart. I see others chugging their problems away with Karkov Vodka. I see a crazy lady with white wispy hair preaching nonsense to the world on the corner of McCully and Kapiolani Blvd. I see “Mooch,” a native Hawaiian surfer, every Sunday, where he lives at my favorite surf spot, Rockpiles by Ala Moana.

I find myself trying to sweep my memories of the homeless away under a bridge, just like how the government tries to sweep them away, hoping they’ll be less visible. The fact of the matter is that sweeping away homeless people with more “Sit-lie” bands do nothing but move them around. Conducting city sweeps does not solve the root of the homeless problem. The government must stop wasting time on money and sweeps and work towards more permanent/affordable housing along with a livable minimum wage.

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August 11, 2015

Is It Getting Hot In Here?

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Have you noticed that everything has been getting warmer, even the seasons? The winters are not what they used to be. You struggle to find that fresh patch of power to shred with the new board you just bought—snowboarding is tough when there’s no snow. Falls have turned into winters, and winters into springs, with so much as the blink of an eye. You begin to wonder if the four distinct seasons turned into just one. The constant warming of the Earth is making it difficult to enjoy those individual four seasons.

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