Archive for ‘Environment’

August 15, 2015

Target Island Needs $1 Billion from US Military

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By: Megan Kono

The Island of Kaho’olawe is just off the coast of Maui and was used by the US Navy for military target practice. The Navy bombed the 45 square mile island from World War II. After decades of protests by the Native Hawaiians, President George H W. Bush ordered the military to stop their target practice in December of 1990. It was agreed that the military would remove 100% of the ordinance from Kahoolawe.

Forty-two years later, “Despite an expensive cleanup of unexploded ordnance [by the US Military], the island and its surrounding waters are still littered with bullets, shells and bombs.” Scientists from over fifty countries urge the “U.S. military to spend $1 billion to remove the unexploded ordnance on Kahoolawe and restore its environment.” The Navy’s failure to clean up Kaho’olawe has caused damage to the Island and Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners; they should be held responsible for the damage they have caused.

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August 15, 2015

The Naked Truth behind the Backpackers in their Birthday Suits

naked-trip_3314697kby Esther Ng

It took several hours. I had believed them when they told me that oxygen thinned as you went higher in altitude, but I wasn’t prepared for the onslaught of first-hand experience. It took nearly twenty breaks in between scaling the smooth slab of rocks to eventually reach the base of the highest peak of Mount Kinabalu—Low’s Peak, or so it was named. On my left was South Peak, the second highest peak whose image is emblazoned on Malaysia’s hundred ringgit note. My breathing was difficult and shallow, and I thought, for probably the hundredth time that day, that any hopes of scaling Mount Everest were an immediate shutdown.

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August 15, 2015

Hawaii Need’s to Burn its Recycling Program

Going green? Our society has seen some drastic changes when it comes to protecting the environment.  For some, when they hear the words “Global Warming,” Al Gore comes to mind. The Inconvenient Truth presentation given by Al Gore illustrates the harsh realities of our environmental impact on Earth. To this day, right before I throw my plastic bottle into the waste can or “grey barrel”, I can’t help but to stop and think of the melting iceberg with the adorable polar bear on it.

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August 15, 2015

TechNOlogy

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By: Maria Goodwin

Compare a personal public bus ride experience with an bus experience your grandparents have had. It’s likely they will tell of fresh conversation and meeting new people. These days, we put plugs in and tune out. Screens surround us – iPods, TVs, cellphones, computers – our lives are enveloped in technology and if often seems there is no escaping it. Millennials  are very attached to technology, but the most in ‘danger’ of a full real-world detachment are the future generations who will grow up completely surrounded by technology. I have watched my little cousins all sit together and not say one word to each while they stare blankly into their bring screens. A moment meant to be spent in community is squandered while emojis are jammed into a text box. As a nanny of six years, what I found most terrifying was the youngest boy being able to work his way around Youtube and iPhone apps, but he could barely form full sentences. Though we’ve made countless important discoveries and have accomplished a great deal thanks to the ever-evolving technological world, the lasting effect it has on our upcoming generations is one I feel could be devastating, especially in a social context.

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August 13, 2015

Mauna Kea’s Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) benefits Hawaii

FILE - This undated file artist rendering made available by the TMT Observatory Corporation shows the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope, planned to be built atop Mauna Kea, a large dormand volcano in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii in Hawaii. Gov.  About 20 people opposed to building what would be one of the world's largest telescopes on a Hawaii mountain are camped out near the construction site, Tuesday, June 23, 2015, vowing to stop work from resuming.  (AP Photo/TMT Observatory Corporation, File) NO SALES

The summit of Mauna Kea is the Earth’s clearest window to the rest of the Universe. Mauna Kea when measured from sea level is the highest point in the Pacific Ocean. From the base at the bottom of the sea, Mauna Kea is the tallest mountain on Planet Earth.

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August 13, 2015

End Nuclear Research and Development

Nuclear weapons pose the highest threat to the existence of mankind than any other because of their radioactive nature. It is a fact that a single nuclear warhead can kill millions of people and its effects lasting for many years. Nuclear power plants also run the risk of directly impacting our environment.

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August 12, 2015

May Cecil the Lion’s Wrongful Death Not Be in Vain

Cecil with Cubs 1By Susan Ha

When you think of Africa, what animal stands out to you as the king of the jungle? The lion, of course, and that is why it is named so. The lion is at the top of the food chain, and has forever been a symbol of “strength, power, and ferocity.” Its roar can be heard from 5 miles away, and it can run as fast as 50 mph for short distances, and leap as far as 36 feet. Lions are also the most social of all big cats, and live together in prides, which consists mostly of females and a few males. Cecil was such a beautiful and majestic 13 year old lion and the king of his pride, which consisted of 3 lionesses and 8 cubs, and he had a rare black mane to show it. He was very friendly and tame, and thousands of tourists came yearly to Hwange National Park, a wildlife reserve in Zimbabwe, just to see him.

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August 12, 2015

The Tent City: Running Out Of Room For Sweeps

Tents line the sidewalks at Ohe Street near Waterfront Park in Kakaako. 30dec2014 . photograph Cory Lum/Civil Beat http://www.civilbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/kakaako-homeless-ohe-street1-640x322.jpg

Tents in Kakaako. 30dec2014 . photograph Cory Lum/Civil Beat.

As I drive by Kaka’ako, I see homeless children, mothers, and fathers, pushing their possessions in a shopping cart. I see others chugging their problems away with Karkov Vodka. I see a crazy lady with white wispy hair preaching nonsense to the world on the corner of McCully and Kapiolani Blvd. I see “Mooch,” a native Hawaiian surfer, every Sunday, where he lives at my favorite surf spot, Rockpiles by Ala Moana.

I find myself trying to sweep my memories of the homeless away under a bridge, just like how the government tries to sweep them away, hoping they’ll be less visible. The fact of the matter is that sweeping away homeless people with more “Sit-lie” bands do nothing but move them around. Conducting city sweeps does not solve the root of the homeless problem. The government must stop wasting time on money and sweeps and work towards more permanent/affordable housing along with a livable minimum wage.

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August 11, 2015

Is It Getting Hot In Here?

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Have you noticed that everything has been getting warmer, even the seasons? The winters are not what they used to be. You struggle to find that fresh patch of power to shred with the new board you just bought—snowboarding is tough when there’s no snow. Falls have turned into winters, and winters into springs, with so much as the blink of an eye. You begin to wonder if the four distinct seasons turned into just one. The constant warming of the Earth is making it difficult to enjoy those individual four seasons.

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August 10, 2015

A’ole TMT, A’ole

11182223_1564415233822521_2941821986066975327_n-615x410They call it Hawaii’s Civil Rights Movement. The controversy of the thirty-meter telescope (TMT) constructing on Mauna Kea arises many issues of native Hawaiian beliefs, practices and astronomers legal claims. Mauna Kea’s “summit is 9 kilometers above the adjacent ocean floor, making Mauna Kea the tallest mountain in the world.” Hawaiians declare Mauna Kea sacred because they believe their ali’i, Haloa was birthed there; it is their connection to their ancestors. Kanaka (native Hawaiians) connect deeply with the ‘aina (land). The air is clean, thin, away from any urban structures and light pollution, making Mauna Kea the perfect spot for observation. Although the TMT gives promises to new scientific discoveries, human rights and beliefs of native Hawaiians should not have to be sacrificed.

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