Archive for ‘Local’

June 30, 2018

Plastic Pollution is a Major Problem

I researched plastic pollution to write a paper about how it affects the environment, when I was a freshman in highschool. Then again as a senior in highschool. 5 years later and I’m writing about it again. I realize all the information is the same, yet the situation seems to be getting worse. Plastic pollution continues to grow throughout the entire world, even to places where no humans being have ever been. Plastic does so much damage to our environment, there needs to be more of an effort to fix this crisis. 

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June 29, 2018

The Next Gold Rush Won’t Be For Gold

The year was 1848. It was the Monday of January 24th. Anyone familiar with that date? Anyone? Well, it is not an entirely well-known date in American history, or history at all for that matter, unless you are one of the lucky people with an incredible memory for dates. Everyone knows those people. It’s the people who never forget your birthday even though you haven’t talked with them since freshman year of high school, fourteen years ago. It’s the people who know exactly when Memorial Day is versus Labor Day, because let’s be honest, most of us tend to mix the two up. Back to the point however, unless you have an incredibly sharp memory with history, you probably do not recall January 24th, 1848, so allow me to clue you in. January 24th, 1848 was the day Foreman James W. Marshall was working for Pioneer John Sutter up in Coloma, a town about an hour away from California’s capital, Sacramento. While working at Sutter’s Mill, Marshall found a shiny metal in the tailrace of the mill that he was building for Sutter on the American River. Is the memory coming back to you now? No? Well, fear not, I will continue. That shiny metal piece that good ole’ James W. Marshall had found ended up being the beginning of a hunt, of a quest, of a pursuit. For that shiny piece of metal was a man’s ticket to a life full of riches. That shiny piece of metal was gold, and it began what was called the California Gold Rush. 

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June 29, 2018

How Environmental Stewardship Saves Our Coral Reefs

diving-1808717_1920By Eve Berlinsky

Our current geological age has notably been titled the Anthropocene period. Anthropocene means “human caused,” and refers to humanity’s often detrimental influence on the planet that we all call home. This ranges from our impacts on the ocean to the rainforests to the atmosphere to anything else on this planet. There is little to no place on this earth that has not been affected by people in some way. For now, I will focus on the biggest and oldest thing humans have put at risk- the coral reefs.

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June 27, 2018

Keeping Families Together Makes America Great

By Eve Berlinskyposters-2590766_1920

As our country attempts to tackle the topic of immigration, there is heated debate from both opponents and proponents of it. On one side, we see those who believe that immigration should be reduced in order to provide jobs for American citizens. On the other side, we see those who believe that immigrants help better our country by diversifying it, among other reasons. However, it seems that the recently implemented “zero-tolerance” policy has gained the attention of those on both sides. Many people have seen the heartbreaking photos and read the saddening reports of children, as young as two years old, being taken away from their parents as a deterrent to those crossing the United States border. From these accounts, it is evident that this policy is a cruel, barbaric one. Separating children from their parents in a foreign country where many of them do not even speak the language is wrong, and America stands for so much more than that.

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June 27, 2018

Here’s Why We Should Legalize Marijuana

I read an article about a mom who had her cannabis oils confiscated at an airport in the UK, because marijuana is illegal there. However, the purpose of the oils were for her son’s epilepsy. The family has been using the cannabis oils to help calm the natures of the young boy’s seizures. The article says that after having the oils confiscated “he ended up in the hospital after his seizures intensified.” The cannabis oils were later returned on the grounds that this situation was a “medical emergency.” It’s scary to think that without the use of medical marijuana, people in these types of situations don’t have that kind of medication. This is why the use of medical marijuana should be legalized across the US. Don’t you think that if cigarettes are legal, then so should marijuana. Marijuana is illegal, yet is widely known for its health benefits. While cigarettes, which actually deteriorates health is legal. Does that makes sense? No it doesn’t. I believe that all people should have the right to all the types of medication they need. I know a few people who heavily rely on medical marijuana due to pain and mental health. I also have friends who use marijuana to stay away from their addiction to cigarettes and opioids. Knowing this, marijuana should be legal so that people at least have it as a use for medication. It provides many benefits that outweigh the consequences of legalizing it. We need to give a voice to the legalization of marijuana, so that those who are in need of its medicinal properties can have it. 

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June 26, 2018

Your Daily Coffee Is About To Get Roasted

Many are familiar with the name Al Gore. The 45th Vice President of the United States of America. Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election. Divorcee of his high school sweetheart. 1969 Army enlistee. Well now I’m getting off track. The point is, most have heard the name Al Gore at some point in their lives, whether they lived through his vice-presidential terms, or they have heard his name on the news when topics of climate change are brought up. Regardless, Al Gore was ahead of his time. He argued on the existence of climate change and the obligation we have to bring it under control, even winning the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. However, even now, eighteen years after he served as the Vice President and fought for the country to gain a control on climate change, many still do not believe that climate change is a problem that affects them.

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June 26, 2018

Trump’s New Title X Takes Away Crucial Funding for Family Planning Organizations

Screen Shot 2018-06-26 at 12.00.52 AMSomething I don’t think some people realize, is how grueling having a baby can be. The changes to your body and hormones, medical complications, medical finances, etc. If you don’t have the support and stability for that, what can you do? Some people say adoption, but just having your body change out of your control, and giving birth is something that isn’t easy to endure. Many people focus on all the positive aspects of having a baby. However, for many women who aren’t ready for that, it’s a nightmare. The fear of getting pregnant at the wrong time is why we also have contraceptives and places like Planned Parenthood. It’s to give us choice of deciding what we want to do. A lot of the funding that supports women and families in need are being threatened. Trump’s revision of Title X will ruin what was created to help people.

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June 25, 2018

Trusting the Science of Vaccinations

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By Eve Berlinsky

When people decide to have children, there are many choices they must make regarding themselves and their children. These can range all the way from what color they should paint the child’s room to which daycare they should place their child in. These choices seem trivial compared to one of the most important decisions a parent must make- whether or not to vaccinate their child. In the past, the answer to this question was always a yes. It seems that only in recent years people have become less accepting of science and medicine.

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August 13, 2017

Trump’s America: The Charlottesville Horror

TRUMP IS A DUMPOn August 11th, 2017, hundreds of white supremacists rallied together in the collegetown of Charlottesville, Virginia in order to spread fear, hatred, and bigotry amongst the people of the town. For the “alt-right” white supremacists, this was a rally against the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. With lit torches in hand, the protesters also meant to strike a message to anyone not of their race and ideology, showing that they were rallying to take back America for themselves.

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July 2, 2016

It’s Time for Churches to Pay Their Share

moneyThere is an indoor public pool in Brooklyn, New York that has become the subject of a growing debate over discrimination. This is nothing new, public pools were a large issue in the civil rights battles of the 1950’s and 60’s, and public bathhouses have been significant in debates over gay rights.

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June 29, 2016

Striving for collective intelligence 

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By Jade

Were you profoundly focused on the last political remark you read on social media? If so, were you aware that it affected you? In regards to the presidential elections, social media currently has great power. The power of social media is driven by collective intelligence. Collective intelligence in business can enhance a company’s image, increase their profit, or make consumers feel important.

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August 15, 2015

Target Island Needs $1 Billion from US Military

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By: Megan Kono

The Island of Kaho’olawe is just off the coast of Maui and was used by the US Navy for military target practice. The Navy bombed the 45 square mile island from World War II. After decades of protests by the Native Hawaiians, President George H W. Bush ordered the military to stop their target practice in December of 1990. It was agreed that the military would remove 100% of the ordinance from Kahoolawe.

Forty-two years later, “Despite an expensive cleanup of unexploded ordnance [by the US Military], the island and its surrounding waters are still littered with bullets, shells and bombs.” Scientists from over fifty countries urge the “U.S. military to spend $1 billion to remove the unexploded ordnance on Kahoolawe and restore its environment.” The Navy’s failure to clean up Kaho’olawe has caused damage to the Island and Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners; they should be held responsible for the damage they have caused.

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August 15, 2015

Re-Victimized for Speaking Out: The Repercussions of Rape

Rapist Bill Cosby 2By Susan Ha

In a world where Americans try to preach the equality of men and women and the rights that each of us have as citizens, comedian Bill Cosby manipulated his way and lied to the public against accusations from women who claim that he drugged them, and either sexually harassed, sexually assaulted, or raped them. When the first several women came out, the public, including celebrities, appallingly ridiculed them and accused them of being money hungry, fame hungry, or both. Some even had the audacity to ask why these women could not speak up earlier and report it to the police if it was in fact true. Why have they been judged, ridiculed, and victimized for speaking out about their horrendous experiences with the vile comedian, who tried to paint a completely different, wholesome picture of himself to the world? This type of reaction is far too common, especially when the sexual predator is famous or a very prominent person in the community.

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August 13, 2015

Mauna Kea’s Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) benefits Hawaii

FILE - This undated file artist rendering made available by the TMT Observatory Corporation shows the proposed Thirty Meter Telescope, planned to be built atop Mauna Kea, a large dormand volcano in Hilo on the Big Island of Hawaii in Hawaii. Gov.  About 20 people opposed to building what would be one of the world's largest telescopes on a Hawaii mountain are camped out near the construction site, Tuesday, June 23, 2015, vowing to stop work from resuming.  (AP Photo/TMT Observatory Corporation, File) NO SALES

The summit of Mauna Kea is the Earth’s clearest window to the rest of the Universe. Mauna Kea when measured from sea level is the highest point in the Pacific Ocean. From the base at the bottom of the sea, Mauna Kea is the tallest mountain on Planet Earth.

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August 12, 2015

To Teach or to Eat, That is the Question

18583132“Why don’t you pursue a Master’s in Education?”

Sitting in the office of my advisor, she hands me a file containing all the information I would need. “You’re an English major; you can finish your BA and then apply for it, if Education is a path you think you would like to take. I would highly recommend it.”

“Would you?” I ask. It is a tempting proposal. But it would be incredibly daunting. I go through the requirements as my advisor points them and elaborates on its details. It would mean two full years for a Masters, with compulsory in-class training, intensive seminar lessons and examinations to ensure your qualifications. I sigh. But nothing good ever came easy, right?

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August 12, 2015

The Tent City: Running Out Of Room For Sweeps

Tents line the sidewalks at Ohe Street near Waterfront Park in Kakaako. 30dec2014 . photograph Cory Lum/Civil Beat http://www.civilbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/kakaako-homeless-ohe-street1-640x322.jpg

Tents in Kakaako. 30dec2014 . photograph Cory Lum/Civil Beat.

As I drive by Kaka’ako, I see homeless children, mothers, and fathers, pushing their possessions in a shopping cart. I see others chugging their problems away with Karkov Vodka. I see a crazy lady with white wispy hair preaching nonsense to the world on the corner of McCully and Kapiolani Blvd. I see “Mooch,” a native Hawaiian surfer, every Sunday, where he lives at my favorite surf spot, Rockpiles by Ala Moana.

I find myself trying to sweep my memories of the homeless away under a bridge, just like how the government tries to sweep them away, hoping they’ll be less visible. The fact of the matter is that sweeping away homeless people with more “Sit-lie” bands do nothing but move them around. Conducting city sweeps does not solve the root of the homeless problem. The government must stop wasting time on money and sweeps and work towards more permanent/affordable housing along with a livable minimum wage.

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August 11, 2015

Homeless Shelters for Hawaii

homeless hawaiiYou walk down a sidewalk with your friend, chatting. Your friend whispers suddenly, and you stare for a split second. Without thinking, you then duck your head and quicken your pace—you feel a little safer that way. You walk on with your head ducked and continue the conversation with your friend in a slightly hushed tone, taking the occasional sideway glance. Most of us can recognize this scene, having walked the streets of O‘ahu every day.

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August 10, 2015

A’ole TMT, A’ole

11182223_1564415233822521_2941821986066975327_n-615x410They call it Hawaii’s Civil Rights Movement. The controversy of the thirty-meter telescope (TMT) constructing on Mauna Kea arises many issues of native Hawaiian beliefs, practices and astronomers legal claims. Mauna Kea’s “summit is 9 kilometers above the adjacent ocean floor, making Mauna Kea the tallest mountain in the world.” Hawaiians declare Mauna Kea sacred because they believe their ali’i, Haloa was birthed there; it is their connection to their ancestors. Kanaka (native Hawaiians) connect deeply with the ‘aina (land). The air is clean, thin, away from any urban structures and light pollution, making Mauna Kea the perfect spot for observation. Although the TMT gives promises to new scientific discoveries, human rights and beliefs of native Hawaiians should not have to be sacrificed.

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August 14, 2014

Fining and Jailing Hawaii Homeless is Not a Solution

It seems like in almost every city, there is a homeless population. These people live on the streets, under bridges, in forests, or anywhere they can find shelter. From my time living in Hawaii, I know these people very well. It is not uncommon to see them lined up in the sidewalk on Kalakaua Ave., in tents on the beach or sidewalk, in cars on Monsorat Ave. near the zoo, etc. It is also not uncommon to encounter homeless people asking you for money, food, and so on. Currently the state of Hawaii is trying to pass a bill that would charge homeless people a $1000 fine or 30 days in jail for setting up camp on the sidewalks, or existing anywhere in Waikiki.  The thought behind this is that the homeless will eventually have to turn to the shelters, who can help them get the care that they need in hopes of one day getting them off the streets for good. I feel that this approach is completely inappropriate because there are many other things that the government and the public can do to get people off of the streets.

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May 8, 2014

GMO Companies Causing Health Problems to Kauai Residents

pesticidesPineapple, sugar, papaya or seeds; which of these agricultural product do you think is the most valuable product of Hawaii? The answer, is seeds, particularly, seed corn. In 2008, seed crops were valued more than $175,000, while sugar cane came in at second, $44,200 and macadamia nuts in third, $33,500. The reason why seed corn is highly valued, is because of

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