Archive for ‘Politics’

July 6, 2020

Changing Tactics: A New Approach to Managing the Public

The pitfalls of current policing methods have never been so publicly disputed. The ACLU reports that disabled students were arrested 2.9 times more often than the non-disabled, and Native Hawaiian and Native American students were arrested at twice the rate of White students in 2019. This discrepancy is horrifying to imagine but there are measures being taken to rectify this. 

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July 4, 2020

Gov. Ige, Lt. Gov. Green – Are We Trying to Make O’ahu Another Amity Island?

by Cliff Bailey

Amity. Definition of: “FRIENDSHIP especially: friendly relations between nations // an era of international amity”.

Amity Island: “a fictional island located off the coast of New England, and is the main setting of the Jaws franchise.

In Steven Spielberg’s 1975 classic, JAWS, the small Amity Island community, off the coast of New England, is beset by a maneating great white shark. The island’s brand new chief of police, Martin Brody, is responsible for public safety and ends up enlisting the help of Matt Hooper, an oceanographer who specializes in sharks.

Brody’s first big challenge is getting the local government to do what is necessary to keep the shark from killing more people: closing the beaches until the shark is dealt with. This is unheard of as Amity’s primary source of economic activity is summer tourism and Brody and Hooper are trying to get the beaches closed at the very beginning of summer.

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July 4, 2020

The Dangers of Re-opening

Worldwide pandemics are possibly the most dangerous weapon against human safety. “If something came along and was to kill millions of people, a pandemic would be our greatest risk” Bill Gates told interviewers for Vox in May of 2019. Pandemics have the ability to spread rapidly to millions of people in just a matter of months. COVID-19 is currently the largest pandemic affecting the world. There is no vaccine to prevent or cure the deadly virus and as for now the only way to stop its spread is to socially distance. Recently many countries of the world have decided to come out of emergency lockdowns, but this will only increase the number of coronavirus cases. In order to end the spread of this deadly virus, countries must work together and create a plan to decrease infection while vaccines are being created.

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July 4, 2020

Hong Kong Battle for Its Autonomy, How Long Will It Last

Communist China has been attacking on Hong Kong’s autonomy causing violence and protest to appear all over the city. In the past 10 years, Hong Communist China has been attacking Hong Kong’s autonomy causing violence and protest to appear all over the city. In the past ten years, Hong Kong has experienced numerous acts by the Chinese communist government to gain more control of the Hong Kong government and threaten its autonomy. This attack on Hong Kong has been met by stiff opposition labeled as “Hongkongers.” The battle between the Chinese government and Hongkongers in recent years has turned from protests to violence. It has only been 23 of the 50 guaranteed years since Hong Kong received its autonomy, and Communist China’s actions seem that its 50 years might be a little too long.

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July 4, 2020

Defunding the Police: Have Americans Finally had Enough?

Trayvon Martin. George Floyd. Breonna Taylor. Recognize those names? They are black Americans who are victims of police brutality, a senseless act that has outraged the world. With the recent uproar of the Black Lives Matter movement, police brutality has become a pressing issue, and commands from citizens to defund the police have become more deafening than ever. Although we’ve all had our own experiences with the police (some might be good, some might be bad), people of color have to compromise their safety daily because of their skin color. With systemic racism and police brutality persisting throughout centuries, how can we possibly begin to stop it? The answer to that is to defund the police. I believe that to stop police brutality we need to defund the police to create safer, healthier communities in America. 

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July 3, 2020

Diversification or Devastation: Tourism Arrives at an Economic and Ideological Crossroads

By Carin Enovijas

crowded waikikiCatastrophic upheaval and devastation wrought by wars, plagues and natural disasters generally tend to inspire collaborative, innovative solutions to some of humanity’s biggest challenges. Even when empires collapse, “the ratchet effect” is what drives us to keep improving our odds for generational survival and quality of life through increased complexity and diversity. The global Covid-19 pandemic has emerged at a crucial intersection of dysfunction that goes well beyond issues of public health and safety. It has helped to expose the critical erosion of economic, political, and social institutions, while interrupting fragmented efforts to address the imminent devastation of climate change.

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July 2, 2020

The Military’s Evil Truth

By a disgusted veteran

A pervasive problem has shown its ugly face in the wake of Private First Class Vanessa Guillen’s disappearance. The unfortunate and saddening story of a woman who was afraid to speak up about sexual harassment and assault brings the reality and fears of many women in the military. The culture of the military has allowed this type of behavior to thrive and instill fear into those that serve with little promise of action being taken against the offender. While programs exist to try to curb the numbers, is the military doing enough to help the men and women who swore to put their lives on the line for our freedom?

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June 30, 2020

The Statute on Statues

File- In this Aug. 18, 2017, photo, a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest sits in a park in Memphis, Tenn. A new historical marker in Memphis will point out that a famed Confederate general was a prosperous slave trader before the Civil War. The marker near the site of Nathan Bedford Forrest's early home will be unveiled April 4, 2018, on the property of Calvary Episcopal Church, which is sponsoring it along with Rhodes College and the National Park Service, The Commercial Appeal reported. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz, File)

Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest in a park in Memphis, Tenn. A new historical marker will point out that the famed Confederate general was a prosperous slave trader before the Civil War.

by Cliff Bailey

Statues memorializing Confederate war heroes have been a topic of controversy for decades. There are those who say the statues honor their heritage, their ancestry, and a fundamental part of our nation’s history. And then there are those who say that the statues represent hate, division, and a fundamental – yet dark – part of our nation’s history.

It’s very easy for us white folks, especially those of us who grew up in the South, to dismiss the Black cry for justice as a cry of petulance for not getting their way. After all, the Civil War ended in 1865 – over 155 years ago. There’s nobody alive today, black or white, who lived during the time of slavery; so no one has the right to complain about it, and no one has the right to brag about it.

June 30, 2020

Masks! To wear or not to wear that is the question.

photo-1584634731339-252c581abfc5Wearing a mask has become such an issue for Americans the debate has turned into political talking points with the presidential election right around the corner. The democratic candidate Joe Biden released a statement saying he would make masks mandatory for all Americans. This statement was made after the republican candidate, Donald Trump, did not require face mask for his recent rally in Tulsa. So how did we get here? On April 3rd, the CDC advised all people to wear face masks or coverings in public situations when social distancing cannot be maintained. While some industries have eased regulations on face masks, most businesses requiring contact with customers or other employees to do business are still required to wear masks.

June 30, 2020

Putin’s Ambitions

St. Basil’s Cathedral

In a world where globalization has allowed more communication to take place than ever before, one can argue that there are ways in which this fact can be taken advantage of: this is clearly seen in countries such as Russia, where Putin has been the leader for the better part of the last two decades. But it is arguable as to whether or not he is a good leader. It is also difficult to decipher Putin’s true ambitions when it comes to his meddling with the Western world. Is there enough proof to suggest his motivations?

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June 30, 2020

Unnecessary Suspension

Immigration has always been a part of America. In the national anthem, a famous quote is “the land of the free and the home of the brave.” The very foundation of America is built on immigrants from Europe looking for opportunities to make something of themselves. Today, our country is getting further and further away from that concept. President Donald Trump is a big reason why. A couple of his promises during his presidential campaign in 2016 were to build a “great, great wall on our southern border” and massive deportation.  Over the years, Trump has increased deportation, causing many families to be ripped apart. Recently, Trump announced that a few working visas will no longer be available as well as asylum-seekers to be denied a hearing in front of judge if initially denied by immigrations officials until the end of the year. He claims that issuing this will allow the economy to raise back up and help Americans who are struggling. I disagree with Trump and I think it is an unnecessary action to take. Visas H-1B, H-2B, J-1, and L-1 cover foreign workers who have a specialty, fill temporary seasonal jobs, or working while at school in the United States. These people are the ones who create thousands of jobs and act as the backbone of both major and minor companies. The governor of Pennsylvania, Tom Wolf, said, “These workers, who are arriving in Pennsylvania legally, play an essential role in making our communities strong and vibrant.” Losing this group of people (which is a considerably large amount) would be detrimental and unnecessary.

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June 30, 2020

Justice System Reform in America

Since the 1980’s the U.S. incarceration rate has gone up nearly 800%, but the massive increase in imprisonment isn’t due to an increase in crime. In the United States today there are over 2.2 million people incarcerated. The U.S. currently holds the world record for the number of people incarcerated. The United States criminal justice system has been systematically marginalizing minorities and disproportionately criminalizing low- income citizens for decades. In order to establish equality in the country, systemic racism and racial exploitation need to need to be removed from the criminal justice system and police institution.

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June 30, 2020

COVID-19 Impact on Tourism and How Hawaii Should Recover

Screen Shot 2020-06-29 at 8.58.05 PMIn late March, the state of Hawaii’s tourism industry stopped due to travel restrictions. Governor Ige invoked a temporary quarantine that has halted all tourism in the nation from traveling to Hawaii without a mandatory 14-day quarantine. The travel restrictions started in March, requiring all travelers, including residents, that arrive on any island of Hawaii to self-quarantine for 14 days. Like the continental United States, businesses in Hawaii closed their doors as a result of the restriction implemented due to COVID-19.

June 30, 2020

Will a Second Stimulus Check solve all of our problems- Probably not

 Trump’s recent statement has Americans on their toes, focusing on when their second stimulus check is coming through the mail. But should we be waiting for a second stimulus check that might never come? Pandemic numbers continue to run high with several states opening up and the possibility of a “second wave” of the coronavirus is on everyone’s mind. As of May, the nation’s unemployment rates are still up at 13% and people are unsure how much longer the country can stay in lockdown. Though President Trump has recently voiced support for a second stimulus package, the Senate remains divided over the idea of another round of stimulus checks for several reasons. 

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June 30, 2020

The North Korean Dilemma

On July 27, 1953, a sigh of relief reverberated around Korea. An armistice was signed, and the war ceased. The two countries were divided using the 38th parallel separating the two parties. The DMZ was formed as a no-man’s land, and the North was ruled by Kim Il-Sung, starting the legacy of the Kim dynasty. However, as this legacy continued, the country developed god-like ideologies about the Kim family. Today, the United States is viewed as a great deceiver, and North Korea’s actions have repeatedly targeted those in the west. Traditionally, the United States has acted in response to North Korea and its activities. Implementing sanctions and attempting peace talks have been the go-to for our country. But, with a lack of progress being made, we should question if continuing these failed attempts should be repeated. With a growing list of current issues the US is dealing with, such as the upcoming election, COVID-19, and tension from police brutality and racial discrimination, wouldn’t it be wise to focus on more pressing matters closer to home?

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June 30, 2020

Trump and COVID-19: Where American Populism Failed the Test

It has been a turbulent final year for Donald Trump’s term as president of the United States. While he may be used to dealing with money and power, he much like the rest of us could not have anticipated a pandemic. When the stakes were lower for everyone in the world, his ignorant and inhumane rhetoric was easier to laugh off or sidestep. Michelle Goldberg has choice words for the cultural peril that Trump’s presidency represents: “This is what American exceptionalism looks like under Donald Trump…

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June 30, 2020

The Consequences of Ignoring Public Health

In February 2020, a killer broke ground in the United States, and citizens had no idea they were about to become targets of a blind massacre. Frank Gabrin, 60, was the first E.R. physician to feel the sting of the murderer’s weapon. April Dunn, 33, was an outspoken disability rights advocate, who dedicated her life to equal access for those with disabilities before passing. Wogene Debele, 43, died shortly after giving birth to her fourth child, a son, whom she never had the opportunity to meet. There are countless stories like this; stories of ordinary people, good people, who had their life cut short due to this devastation. But what is to blame?

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June 30, 2020

Intersecting Pandemics: Gun Violence is a Public Health Issue Rooted in Inequality

By Carin Enovijas

2 pistolsAmerica is simultaneously fighting two intersecting pandemics: Covid-19 and the deadly spread of chronic, socioeconomic inequalities underlying the proliferation of gun violence that disproportionately affects communities of color. Historically in America, gun violence rises during times of crisis. Economic hardships and social unrest incite fear and panic causing people to scramble for protection, as was the case following the 9-11 terrorist attacks, Hurricane Katrina, the Sandy Hook shootings, and now Covid-19.

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June 30, 2020

How the United States Should Respond to the National Security Law

city-buildings-and-green-trees-near-ocean-1337144China has threatened the freedom and autonomy of Hong Kong once again. The government recently proposed a new national security law for Hong Kong as a direct response to the Hong Kong protests that emerged last year. The key points of this law are: the legislation will order the Hong Kong government to “strengthen oversight and management” of schools, will require Hong Kong to establish its own national security commission with an adviser for Beijing, China will establish its own national security arm in Hong Kong, and the national security law always trumps Hong Kong laws. Essentially, this national security law would remove a lot of freedom that the residents of Hong Kong currently enjoy.

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June 30, 2020

What Defunding the Police Should Mean and Why we Should do It

woman-kneeling-on-the-back-of-a-car-and-holding-a-sign-4613906Everyone has seen or heard the protests that have been going on for the past few weeks. People chanting various phrases such as, “Say their names” or “No justice, no peace, no racist police.” However, one phrase has stuck out, so much so that the idea is gaining traction and support throughout the United States. This phrase is, “Defund the police.” However, people are unable to agree on what defunding the police means and entails. Some believe that it means to abolish the police and some people believe it means to give them funding and so forth.

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