Archive for ‘World’

June 29, 2019

The Individual’s Responsibility in the Name of Fast Fashion

“Beauty is pain” is a mantra that has been immortalized in the fashion industry. Although the phrase is more directed towards women, it is a universal suggestion that consumers must sacrifice something in the name of fashion. However, in light of recent movements for consumers to be conscientious of which types of companies they patronize, beauty – in the context of fast fashion – can now be viewed as a tangible pain to both the environment and forced laborers.

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June 29, 2019

Pro-Life and Pro-Choice Advocates Agreed! But Not For the Same Reasons

By Grace Moritabeautiful-woman-brunette-expectant-2100341.jpg

Last week, a woman in the UK was court-ordered to have her unborn baby killed. The woman’s doctors convinced Justice Nathalie Lieven to compel her to have an abortion because of her mental disabilities. The doctors believed that because she has to the mental age of a child, the birth of and care for the baby would be harmful to the woman and to the child. It was believed that the baby might not be cared for and that the mother would be subject to psychological damage in the process of childbirth. The baby’s grandmother, mother of the woman, joined forces with the woman’s social worker and lawyers to make an appeal because they all believed the baby should be born. Internationally, the public was rooting for the woman; it was even a possibility that the US would get involved in protecting the woman and her child. Many are rejoicing, however, because the ruling was overturned

It is significant that here, many on both sides of the abortion argument agreed that this woman should not be forced to have an abortion.

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June 29, 2019

Changing Life’s Course: CRISPR and Gene-Editing Technology

gene-editing-2375732_960_720Numbered are the days where having your “mother’s eyes” or your “father’s nose” are products of a genetic lottery. Since the discovery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), methods to repair, replace, and repurpose life’s genetic code have become increasingly prevalent. Within the last decade, genetic engineering’s small beginnings have erupted into an industry dedicated to the manipulation of genomes. From increased crop yield to improved disease treatment, the applications of genetic engineering reach far and wide, but this Russian biologist wants to make it possible to choose what features you want in your children.

At the forefront of genetic engineering is a technology known as Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, or CRISPR, whose functions could dictate everything before and between birth and burial. Through its widespread applications, CRISPR pushes scientists to set their sights on creating bigger, better solutions. Some scientists, however, have pushed the envelope of genetic editing by tampering with human life. Stories like China’s commitment to creating more gene-edited babies sparks contentious debate about the ethics of genetic editing and invites an obvious question: should gene-editing technologies, specifically CRISPR, be more heavily regulated?

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June 26, 2019

Trump on Iran (He’s Doing Well!)

By Zack Chan

administration-architecture-building-129112What constitutes the value of a human life? This question is equally moral, ethical, and economic. When it comes to war, it is the decision of military leaders to determine the value of one life versus another. This is god like power, and with the development of sophisticated military technology, that decision can be carried out swiftly with the push of a button from thousands of miles away. Just as deadly are the economic effects that are a byproduct of war. While deaths from lack of food, shelter, and medicine are difficult to calculate and don’t typically make it to news headlines, they are a gruesome and inhumane reality of war. Essentially, the pushing of a button to take a life can happen both literally and figuratively.

So, what constitutes the value of a human life? I argue that officials have a tendency to operate in a way in which the ends justify the means. Winning the war absolves you from the horrible means in which you won the battle. In this paper, I argue the dangers of dehumanizing enemies, specifically the current US enemy number one, Iran.

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June 26, 2019

The Egyptian Silence

flag-1699424_960_720While confined in a soundproof glass cage, Egypt’s first democratically elected leader, former president Mohamed Morsi, dropped dead during a hearing on charges of espionage against him. Despite his significance in Egyptian politics, many state newspapers only published homogeneous, 42-word news articles that were hidden within the third or fourth pages—sections that are usually devoted to monitoring criminal cases. Even the current Egyptian president has remained silent about the death and chose to praise the behavior of Egyptian fans’ during a football match instead of acknowledging Morsi’s passing.

The death of a former president usually triggers national mourning, regardless of location. State funerals are a hallmark of the United States, crowds fill the streets in Canada, and even communist countries, like China, hold nationally televised memorial services for their former leaders. However, Egypt has yet to formally acknowledge the death of their former president.

The action, or lack thereof, raises a crucial question: is Egypt’s indifference toward the passing of Mohamed Morsi justifiable?

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June 24, 2019

Economic Ban Misses Intended Target

cyber-security-cybersecurity-device-60504In the summer of 2018, President Donald Trump declared war on China. Not war in the traditional sense, though armed with tariffs, emergency executive orders, and business banning entity lists, our Commander in Chief has a full arsenal of economic weapons. The most recent segment in this ongoing debate has spawned stiff feedback both at home and abroad.

On May 15, President Trump issued an executive order concluding “that foreign adversaries are increasingly creating and exploiting vulnerabilities in information and communications technology and services […] in order to commit malicious cyber-enabled actions, including economic and industrial espionage against the United States and its people.”

Essentially, finding that foreign powers have been gathering information, stealing trade secrets, and purposefully sabotaging US technology, President Trump has issued a ban on several companies deemed a “threat to national security.”

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June 30, 2018

Plastic Pollution is a Major Problem

I researched plastic pollution to write a paper about how it affects the environment, when I was a freshman in highschool. Then again as a senior in highschool. 5 years later and I’m writing about it again. I realize all the information is the same, yet the situation seems to be getting worse. Plastic pollution continues to grow throughout the entire world, even to places where no humans being have ever been. Plastic does so much damage to our environment, there needs to be more of an effort to fix this crisis. 

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June 29, 2018

The Next Gold Rush Won’t Be For Gold

The year was 1848. It was the Monday of January 24th. Anyone familiar with that date? Anyone? Well, it is not an entirely well-known date in American history, or history at all for that matter, unless you are one of the lucky people with an incredible memory for dates. Everyone knows those people. It’s the people who never forget your birthday even though you haven’t talked with them since freshman year of high school, fourteen years ago. It’s the people who know exactly when Memorial Day is versus Labor Day, because let’s be honest, most of us tend to mix the two up. Back to the point however, unless you have an incredibly sharp memory with history, you probably do not recall January 24th, 1848, so allow me to clue you in. January 24th, 1848 was the day Foreman James W. Marshall was working for Pioneer John Sutter up in Coloma, a town about an hour away from California’s capital, Sacramento. While working at Sutter’s Mill, Marshall found a shiny metal in the tailrace of the mill that he was building for Sutter on the American River. Is the memory coming back to you now? No? Well, fear not, I will continue. That shiny metal piece that good ole’ James W. Marshall had found ended up being the beginning of a hunt, of a quest, of a pursuit. For that shiny piece of metal was a man’s ticket to a life full of riches. That shiny piece of metal was gold, and it began what was called the California Gold Rush. 

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June 29, 2018

How Environmental Stewardship Saves Our Coral Reefs

diving-1808717_1920By Eve Berlinsky

Our current geological age has notably been titled the Anthropocene period. Anthropocene means “human caused,” and refers to humanity’s often detrimental influence on the planet that we all call home. This ranges from our impacts on the ocean to the rainforests to the atmosphere to anything else on this planet. There is little to no place on this earth that has not been affected by people in some way. For now, I will focus on the biggest and oldest thing humans have put at risk- the coral reefs.

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June 27, 2018

Here’s Why We Should Legalize Marijuana

I read an article about a mom who had her cannabis oils confiscated at an airport in the UK, because marijuana is illegal there. However, the purpose of the oils were for her son’s epilepsy. The family has been using the cannabis oils to help calm the natures of the young boy’s seizures. The article says that after having the oils confiscated “he ended up in the hospital after his seizures intensified.” The cannabis oils were later returned on the grounds that this situation was a “medical emergency.” It’s scary to think that without the use of medical marijuana, people in these types of situations don’t have that kind of medication. This is why the use of medical marijuana should be legalized across the US. Don’t you think that if cigarettes are legal, then so should marijuana. Marijuana is illegal, yet is widely known for its health benefits. While cigarettes, which actually deteriorates health is legal. Does that makes sense? No it doesn’t. I believe that all people should have the right to all the types of medication they need. I know a few people who heavily rely on medical marijuana due to pain and mental health. I also have friends who use marijuana to stay away from their addiction to cigarettes and opioids. Knowing this, marijuana should be legal so that people at least have it as a use for medication. It provides many benefits that outweigh the consequences of legalizing it. We need to give a voice to the legalization of marijuana, so that those who are in need of its medicinal properties can have it. 

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June 26, 2018

From Zero Tolerance Policy to Zero Tolerance Morals

barb-wires-barbed-wire-barrier-340585By Kāʻai Fernandez

America, the land of the free and the home of the brave, was built on the backs of the poor, of the hungry, of the huddled masses. This country of ours was founded on the hopes and dreams of a people who felt hopeless in the Old World, who traveled thousands of miles over open ocean in dangerous conditions, into the unknown, for nothing but a chance at a new life. And after its founding, immigrants came because America had limitless opportunities, because America had freedom, because American had humane, morally good policies for struggling immigrants.

Those humane immigration policies don’t appear to exist anymore.

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June 26, 2018

Your Daily Coffee Is About To Get Roasted

Many are familiar with the name Al Gore. The 45th Vice President of the United States of America. Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election. Divorcee of his high school sweetheart. 1969 Army enlistee. Well now I’m getting off track. The point is, most have heard the name Al Gore at some point in their lives, whether they lived through his vice-presidential terms, or they have heard his name on the news when topics of climate change are brought up. Regardless, Al Gore was ahead of his time. He argued on the existence of climate change and the obligation we have to bring it under control, even winning the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. However, even now, eighteen years after he served as the Vice President and fought for the country to gain a control on climate change, many still do not believe that climate change is a problem that affects them.

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June 25, 2018

Trusting the Science of Vaccinations

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By Eve Berlinsky

When people decide to have children, there are many choices they must make regarding themselves and their children. These can range all the way from what color they should paint the child’s room to which daycare they should place their child in. These choices seem trivial compared to one of the most important decisions a parent must make- whether or not to vaccinate their child. In the past, the answer to this question was always a yes. It seems that only in recent years people have become less accepting of science and medicine.

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June 24, 2018

Amusement and Theme Parks Would Be Wise to Follow in SeaWorld’s Footsteps

Every month I look forward to receiving my monthly copy of National Geographic. The vibrant, striking photos on the cover with their intriguing captions and headlines never cease to capture my attention. This month, when I pulled my copy out of the mailbox, I was immediately struck by the beauty of the iceberg the cover image displayed. It was bright, white, and shimmering in the sunlight, reflecting itself onto the ocean surrounding it. However, upon closer glance, I came to the realization that it was no iceberg at all, but instead, it was a plastic bag partly submerged in the ocean with the headline “Planet or Plastic? 18 billion pounds of plastic ends up in the ocean each year. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.”   

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August 13, 2017

Trump’s America: The Charlottesville Horror

TRUMP IS A DUMPOn August 11th, 2017, hundreds of white supremacists rallied together in the collegetown of Charlottesville, Virginia in order to spread fear, hatred, and bigotry amongst the people of the town. For the “alt-right” white supremacists, this was a rally against the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. With lit torches in hand, the protesters also meant to strike a message to anyone not of their race and ideology, showing that they were rallying to take back America for themselves.

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August 8, 2017

Is Peace Possible With North Korea?

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“I wish for world peace” is a common thing to hear when you ask people what they wish for this world. But how far do we have to go, and could go, to ensure it? Would it be acceptable to use force against someone that threatens peace? Although being the one trying to keep the peace and being the one that threatens the peace should have a clear division, the truth is that there are blurred lines between both categories.

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June 29, 2016

Striving for collective intelligence 

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By Jade

Were you profoundly focused on the last political remark you read on social media? If so, were you aware that it affected you? In regards to the presidential elections, social media currently has great power. The power of social media is driven by collective intelligence. Collective intelligence in business can enhance a company’s image, increase their profit, or make consumers feel important.

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June 29, 2016

Supreme Court Stops Obama’s Immigration Plan

affirmative-actionStevie was my neighbor from the time I was born. We played together just about every day, and we went to Kindergarten together at the public school up the hill from our houses. We played with G.I. Joe mostly, and I never saw the irony in that. It never registered with me that his name was actually Esteban. Even when his parents were speaking Spanish they called him Stevie.

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June 28, 2016

Net Neutrality is a Good Thing

AmplifyWhat is the Internet? It seems like an easy question, but is it? Do we really know what the Internet is? We know what Facebook or Google is. We know what we use every day on our phones. However, who can actually formulate an accurate definition of the Internet? That is our first step on the way to stasis. What is it? We can argue about it, we can debate how to use it, but without a definition, it is just sound and fury, signifying nothing.

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August 15, 2015

The Naked Truth behind the Backpackers in their Birthday Suits

naked-trip_3314697kby Esther Ng

It took several hours. I had believed them when they told me that oxygen thinned as you went higher in altitude, but I wasn’t prepared for the onslaught of first-hand experience. It took nearly twenty breaks in between scaling the smooth slab of rocks to eventually reach the base of the highest peak of Mount Kinabalu—Low’s Peak, or so it was named. On my left was South Peak, the second highest peak whose image is emblazoned on Malaysia’s hundred ringgit note. My breathing was difficult and shallow, and I thought, for probably the hundredth time that day, that any hopes of scaling Mount Everest were an immediate shutdown.

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