Archive for ‘World’

June 30, 2018

Plastic Pollution is a Major Problem

I researched plastic pollution to write a paper about how it affects the environment, when I was a freshman in highschool. Then again as a senior in highschool. 5 years later and I’m writing about it again. I realize all the information is the same, yet the situation seems to be getting worse. Plastic pollution continues to grow throughout the entire world, even to places where no humans being have ever been. Plastic does so much damage to our environment, there needs to be more of an effort to fix this crisis. 

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June 29, 2018

The Next Gold Rush Won’t Be For Gold

The year was 1848. It was the Monday of January 24th. Anyone familiar with that date? Anyone? Well, it is not an entirely well-known date in American history, or history at all for that matter, unless you are one of the lucky people with an incredible memory for dates. Everyone knows those people. It’s the people who never forget your birthday even though you haven’t talked with them since freshman year of high school, fourteen years ago. It’s the people who know exactly when Memorial Day is versus Labor Day, because let’s be honest, most of us tend to mix the two up. Back to the point however, unless you have an incredibly sharp memory with history, you probably do not recall January 24th, 1848, so allow me to clue you in. January 24th, 1848 was the day Foreman James W. Marshall was working for Pioneer John Sutter up in Coloma, a town about an hour away from California’s capital, Sacramento. While working at Sutter’s Mill, Marshall found a shiny metal in the tailrace of the mill that he was building for Sutter on the American River. Is the memory coming back to you now? No? Well, fear not, I will continue. That shiny metal piece that good ole’ James W. Marshall had found ended up being the beginning of a hunt, of a quest, of a pursuit. For that shiny piece of metal was a man’s ticket to a life full of riches. That shiny piece of metal was gold, and it began what was called the California Gold Rush. 

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June 29, 2018

How Environmental Stewardship Saves Our Coral Reefs

diving-1808717_1920By Eve Berlinsky

Our current geological age has notably been titled the Anthropocene period. Anthropocene means “human caused,” and refers to humanity’s often detrimental influence on the planet that we all call home. This ranges from our impacts on the ocean to the rainforests to the atmosphere to anything else on this planet. There is little to no place on this earth that has not been affected by people in some way. For now, I will focus on the biggest and oldest thing humans have put at risk- the coral reefs.

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June 27, 2018

Here’s Why We Should Legalize Marijuana

I read an article about a mom who had her cannabis oils confiscated at an airport in the UK, because marijuana is illegal there. However, the purpose of the oils were for her son’s epilepsy. The family has been using the cannabis oils to help calm the natures of the young boy’s seizures. The article says that after having the oils confiscated “he ended up in the hospital after his seizures intensified.” The cannabis oils were later returned on the grounds that this situation was a “medical emergency.” It’s scary to think that without the use of medical marijuana, people in these types of situations don’t have that kind of medication. This is why the use of medical marijuana should be legalized across the US. Don’t you think that if cigarettes are legal, then so should marijuana. Marijuana is illegal, yet is widely known for its health benefits. While cigarettes, which actually deteriorates health is legal. Does that makes sense? No it doesn’t. I believe that all people should have the right to all the types of medication they need. I know a few people who heavily rely on medical marijuana due to pain and mental health. I also have friends who use marijuana to stay away from their addiction to cigarettes and opioids. Knowing this, marijuana should be legal so that people at least have it as a use for medication. It provides many benefits that outweigh the consequences of legalizing it. We need to give a voice to the legalization of marijuana, so that those who are in need of its medicinal properties can have it. 

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June 26, 2018

From Zero Tolerance Policy to Zero Tolerance Morals

barb-wires-barbed-wire-barrier-340585By Kāʻai Fernandez

America, the land of the free and the home of the brave, was built on the backs of the poor, of the hungry, of the huddled masses. This country of ours was founded on the hopes and dreams of a people who felt hopeless in the Old World, who traveled thousands of miles over open ocean in dangerous conditions, into the unknown, for nothing but a chance at a new life. And after its founding, immigrants came because America had limitless opportunities, because America had freedom, because American had humane, morally good policies for struggling immigrants.

Those humane immigration policies don’t appear to exist anymore.

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June 26, 2018

Your Daily Coffee Is About To Get Roasted

Many are familiar with the name Al Gore. The 45th Vice President of the United States of America. Democratic nominee for the 2000 presidential election. Divorcee of his high school sweetheart. 1969 Army enlistee. Well now I’m getting off track. The point is, most have heard the name Al Gore at some point in their lives, whether they lived through his vice-presidential terms, or they have heard his name on the news when topics of climate change are brought up. Regardless, Al Gore was ahead of his time. He argued on the existence of climate change and the obligation we have to bring it under control, even winning the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. However, even now, eighteen years after he served as the Vice President and fought for the country to gain a control on climate change, many still do not believe that climate change is a problem that affects them.

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June 25, 2018

Trusting the Science of Vaccinations

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By Eve Berlinsky

When people decide to have children, there are many choices they must make regarding themselves and their children. These can range all the way from what color they should paint the child’s room to which daycare they should place their child in. These choices seem trivial compared to one of the most important decisions a parent must make- whether or not to vaccinate their child. In the past, the answer to this question was always a yes. It seems that only in recent years people have become less accepting of science and medicine.

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June 24, 2018

Amusement and Theme Parks Would Be Wise to Follow in SeaWorld’s Footsteps

Every month I look forward to receiving my monthly copy of National Geographic. The vibrant, striking photos on the cover with their intriguing captions and headlines never cease to capture my attention. This month, when I pulled my copy out of the mailbox, I was immediately struck by the beauty of the iceberg the cover image displayed. It was bright, white, and shimmering in the sunlight, reflecting itself onto the ocean surrounding it. However, upon closer glance, I came to the realization that it was no iceberg at all, but instead, it was a plastic bag partly submerged in the ocean with the headline “Planet or Plastic? 18 billion pounds of plastic ends up in the ocean each year. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.”   

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August 13, 2017

Trump’s America: The Charlottesville Horror

TRUMP IS A DUMPOn August 11th, 2017, hundreds of white supremacists rallied together in the collegetown of Charlottesville, Virginia in order to spread fear, hatred, and bigotry amongst the people of the town. For the “alt-right” white supremacists, this was a rally against the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. With lit torches in hand, the protesters also meant to strike a message to anyone not of their race and ideology, showing that they were rallying to take back America for themselves.

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August 8, 2017

Is Peace Possible With North Korea?

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“I wish for world peace” is a common thing to hear when you ask people what they wish for this world. But how far do we have to go, and could go, to ensure it? Would it be acceptable to use force against someone that threatens peace? Although being the one trying to keep the peace and being the one that threatens the peace should have a clear division, the truth is that there are blurred lines between both categories.

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June 29, 2016

Striving for collective intelligence 

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By Jade

Were you profoundly focused on the last political remark you read on social media? If so, were you aware that it affected you? In regards to the presidential elections, social media currently has great power. The power of social media is driven by collective intelligence. Collective intelligence in business can enhance a company’s image, increase their profit, or make consumers feel important.

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June 29, 2016

Supreme Court Stops Obama’s Immigration Plan

affirmative-actionStevie was my neighbor from the time I was born. We played together just about every day, and we went to Kindergarten together at the public school up the hill from our houses. We played with G.I. Joe mostly, and I never saw the irony in that. It never registered with me that his name was actually Esteban. Even when his parents were speaking Spanish they called him Stevie.

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June 28, 2016

Net Neutrality is a Good Thing

AmplifyWhat is the Internet? It seems like an easy question, but is it? Do we really know what the Internet is? We know what Facebook or Google is. We know what we use every day on our phones. However, who can actually formulate an accurate definition of the Internet? That is our first step on the way to stasis. What is it? We can argue about it, we can debate how to use it, but without a definition, it is just sound and fury, signifying nothing.

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August 15, 2015

The Naked Truth behind the Backpackers in their Birthday Suits

naked-trip_3314697kby Esther Ng

It took several hours. I had believed them when they told me that oxygen thinned as you went higher in altitude, but I wasn’t prepared for the onslaught of first-hand experience. It took nearly twenty breaks in between scaling the smooth slab of rocks to eventually reach the base of the highest peak of Mount Kinabalu—Low’s Peak, or so it was named. On my left was South Peak, the second highest peak whose image is emblazoned on Malaysia’s hundred ringgit note. My breathing was difficult and shallow, and I thought, for probably the hundredth time that day, that any hopes of scaling Mount Everest were an immediate shutdown.

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August 15, 2015

Children Having Children

5359438BY: Jessica Pereira

Ages 9-11 are, according to the CDC, considered “Middle Childhood.” Children might be developing complex friendships, dealing with peer pressue, participating in sports and facing more academic challenges. As middle childhood is approaches, children become more independent and begin to find their footing as they find goals and develop their identities. When I was eleven I was worried about who I would invite to my birthday party, remembering the steps for my ballet recitals, feeding my Neopet, going to a new school, and not much else. Eleven year olds do have a few things to worry about, but having a baby shouldn’t be one of them. Contrary to the notion that young girls should not carry children (as it poses serious health risks and social consequences) it is a sad fact that 2 million births are to girls who are 14 or younger.

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August 15, 2015

Japan War Crimes: Not Simply A Matter of Apologizing

shinzo abeThis upcoming weekend will be a day of remembrance, with August 15, 2015 marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, also known as V-J Day, or Victory over Japan Day. The war ended with Japan’s surrender, ending the destructive war that began on 1939. Without a doubt, this weekend will conjure up emotions for many as it still does today, especially for the war’s survivors.

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August 15, 2015

Cecil the Lion: a Distraction From Substantial Issues

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By Chase Parongao

Think back to a time when you went to the zoo. Wasn’t it amazing to see such beautiful creatures right before your eyes?  I remember being so intrigued by the wide array of animals that roamed the grass, swung from trees, swam in ponds, and relaxed under the shade.  The best part was reading about the animals’ lives – where they were born, what they eat, where their natural habitat is, and finding out their name.  It was like no other experience. 

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August 14, 2015

That Ever Growing Fear

downloadIt is getting late. The sky is turning that beautiful pink as the sun sets. And I’m nowhere near where I need to be. So what do I do? I call Uber—a taxi company.

The Uber driver arrives, and I get into the large, black SUV. The driver takes little notice of me, except to ask the question as to where I’m going. There’s a slight smell of Taco Bell—his dinner I’m assuming. I’m thinking should I strike up a conversation or just sit here awkwardly? If I start a conversation, then I can find out more about this guy, incase anything bad happens and I can tell the police. Hmm…

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August 13, 2015

End Nuclear Research and Development

Nuclear weapons pose the highest threat to the existence of mankind than any other because of their radioactive nature. It is a fact that a single nuclear warhead can kill millions of people and its effects lasting for many years. Nuclear power plants also run the risk of directly impacting our environment.

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August 12, 2015

May Cecil the Lion’s Wrongful Death Not Be in Vain

Cecil with Cubs 1By Susan Ha

When you think of Africa, what animal stands out to you as the king of the jungle? The lion, of course, and that is why it is named so. The lion is at the top of the food chain, and has forever been a symbol of “strength, power, and ferocity.” Its roar can be heard from 5 miles away, and it can run as fast as 50 mph for short distances, and leap as far as 36 feet. Lions are also the most social of all big cats, and live together in prides, which consists mostly of females and a few males. Cecil was such a beautiful and majestic 13 year old lion and the king of his pride, which consisted of 3 lionesses and 8 cubs, and he had a rare black mane to show it. He was very friendly and tame, and thousands of tourists came yearly to Hwange National Park, a wildlife reserve in Zimbabwe, just to see him.

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